Vittoria speaks again tonight in Perugia


I have sent someone to see Amanda’s cellmate Vittoria tonight in Perugia, as I am currently in London. Vittoria is jubilant that her evening curfew has just been lifted and she is a totally free woman. My envoy asked her some questions about dates and details to try and stem to tide of doubters.
She says she was in Capanne from 2006 to 2009, I am unsure as to whether she was in a different prison before that. Amanda joined her in her cell after Meredith’s murder and they spent more than a year living together until Vittoria was released. Vittoria’s daughter, Maria, was diagnosed with lymphoma in June 2007, and Vittoria made regular visits to see her in hospital, returning to Capanne at night. Vittoria says she remembers Rosa who also shared the cell with them for a time but not Florisbella. She claims that there were many foreigners with complicated names that the inmates couldn’t pronounce, and they inevitably changed their names to Italian names, and this may have been one of them. Vittoria says their other cell mate, Sabina, is now out of prison and I am planning an interview with her. Another intimate, another view, another set of eyes. Vittoria said tonight, I have to say again that Amanda never appeared to mourn Meredith, but when Meredith’s face came up on TV she always said she was her best friend. She never seemed preoccupied or distressed in prison the way you would imagine a young girl would be. She was serene, relaxed and said she was always assured by her lawyer that she would walk, it was just a matter of time.

She didn’t flirt with anyone in the prison and had no physical contact with anyone, nothing like that. But she received sackfuls of fan mail and even love letters. She talked about her American boyfriend back in Seattle and said he was her real boyfriend, not Raffaele.
What I feel and always felt is that she’s guilty, Vittoria said. She’s an actress. She knows how to manipulate and play with people. Many of us in the prison felt that. She has that gift of charm, she knows how to make people believe her, but we saw her every day and we didn’t like who she really was.

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126 Responses to “Vittoria speaks again tonight in Perugia”

  1. Annella Says:

    Bree..you would do well to not give links to sources such as people.co.uk. as it does not help your cause one bit. That is a once weekly British tabloid which revels in squalid reporting. An example from that link ” Unlike Knox, Sollecito has stayed out of the public eye” . A laughable statement given that is what Amanda strives for but the Press ( especially tabloids) dont leave her alone, she is stalked by them and Im positive she longs to be ‘ out of the public eye’. I have not once seen her head deliberately to photographers and pose for photos, if you have please let us know.

  2. Annella Says:

    And Bree, strange behaviour does not a murderer make.

  3. Kaosium Says:

    Amber, Rudy Guede had embarked on a life of petty crime and garnered himself a reputation as a ‘girl-botherer.’

    He was a *scary* kid just out of his teens.

    Incidentally, why would anyone think that costume was a ‘cat burglar?’ What kind of ‘cat-burglar’ would have their face made up like that? I thought she looked more like a street artist, but who knows if that was even her costume for the night. It might have just been her with the face made up, wearing what she did before she changed. She didn’t *pose* for that camera, some dude following her around snapped it, kinda creepy when you think about it.

    As for the police station, Amanda spent 53 of 89 hours with the police between the discovery of the murder and her effective arrest at 5:45 AM after the signing of the second statement. More than 40 of those hours in about three days she spent at the Questura, voluntarily to help police as much as she could. Those girls left the country and made catty comments to the papers after her arrest.

    She did lots of things in that 40 hours at Questura, a full weeks work for some in three and a half days, including an all-nighter. She was basically living there, either being interviewed or interrogated or waiting for someone else. She couldn’t go home, and was afraid to be alone, she didn’t really have anywhere else to go outside Raffaele’s.

  4. Sally Shea Says:

    There’s an important context for everything that Vittoria says: she knows Amanda will be writing a book including details of her prison experience. That book won’t reflect well on Vittoria, if you believe Sharon’s interviews. Vittoria has admitted behaving badly — ganging up on Amanda with her cellmate and doing things purposely just to annoy her — but she wants us to believe that she only did these things because Amanda was rude first. In short, she’s trying to justify her poor behavior before Amanda’s book comes out. If Amanda hadn’t been so darn annoying — reading, exercising, and turning down offers of sleeping pills — and, worst of all, confidently asserting that she’d be found innocent and released — Vittoria wouldn’t have had to behave so abominably.

  5. Sally Shea Says:

    When I hear people insist that Amanda was “strange” — as if that was relevant to a determination of guilt or innocence — I’m reminded once again of the Salem witch trials (or, in Europe, the Inquisition). Many innocent women have been put to death because people thought they were strange. I had hoped “civilized” people had moved beyond that. This case proved to me how far we still have to go.

  6. Chris_Halkides Says:

    Bree,

    We already dealt with livor mortis in the previous thread. The short answer is that even one of the prosecution’s expert witnesses did not think that the spot in question was livor mortis, IIUC.

  7. Amber Says:

    Frank says: “Amber, my comment was the statements themselves would not be considered exaggerations. Based on my understanding of the events of the day of the discovery, if he actually said this I would consider them lies, not exaggerations.”

    Thank you frank for confirming for me why I am able to say Raffaele is not a credible person as I fully believe this interview he gave to press, not one of merediths friends. Maybe you should get your facts straight before calling out Amandas cell mate as none credible when Amanda and Raffaele gave many exaggerated/lies as statements following Merediths murder. Guess it’s another of those double standards that doesn’t apply to the “kids”.

  8. Chris_Halkides Says:

    Amber,

    You seem to be putting a great deal of stock in the Kate Mansey article. Do you think that this article is an accurate reflection of what Raffaele really said?

  9. Amber Says:

    Yes I do I’ve been given no reason not to. In fact I think it’s typical of a young person to exaggerate a little to make their story a better. Unfortunately for Raffaele I think he went a little far with the details.

  10. Frank Says:

    Amber, there are numerous documented statements from Raffaele describing the night of the murder. He never once mentioned a party with one of his friends. He has consistently said he and Amanda were at his home watching a movie. They had an eyewitness who placed them at his place. There was indisputable evidence of the movie the claimed to have watched being streamed to his computer at his home. No one but Mansey reported this ‘false alibi’ by Sollecito. Why do you think that is?

    There is no question Vittoria made the comments she did – Sharon has them on tape. Does Mansey have a tape recording of her interview? Did the police hear it? If so, why wasn’t this brought up as an example of Sollecito lying at the trial?

  11. Skind Says:

    “When I hear people insist that Amanda was “strange” — as if that was relevant to a determination of guilt or innocence — I’m reminded once again of the Salem witch trials (or, in Europe, the Inquisition)”

    Personally, I’m reminded of……well, pretty much every person I can think of that’s ever been found not guilty of murder on appeal or retrial.

    Even people that turned out not to be involved at all (most notable recent case being Chris Jefferies) have had/are still having thier behaviour reframed and re-interpreted in the context of ‘obviously’ being a bit of a “right wrong ‘un”.

    That people came forward to suggest that a murder suspect was ‘odd’ and ‘cold’ is a bit like people coming forward to suggest that an animal suspected of being a duck might, in fact, quack a bit.

    It’s odd that Knox is supposedly a great manipulator and actress, yet is supposedly far too cold and distant, all at the same time.

  12. Amber Says:

    Frank you are right there are numerous documented statements from Raffaele. He did say numerous different things about that night. One can only hope that Hellmann’s reasonings are as good as most of you alls. Of the you are wrong and I’m right variety.

  13. Chris_Halkides Says:

    Amber,

    Mansey’s story has a number of errors in it (Amanda is not from Washington, DC, for example. Mansey wrote, “He said: ‘It was a normal night. Meredith had gone out with one of her English friends and Amanda and I went to party with one of my friends.'” This is not quite right with respect to Meredith and ambiguous with respect to Raffaele in the sense that “to party” does not mean the same thing as “to a party.” Mansey wrote, “She never normally locked her bedroom door,” and this sounds as if Luca, not Raffaele were her source. There is also some idiomatic English, such as “straight away,” that sounds like a paraphrase. I think that this article was pieced together from interviews with more than one person and a dollop of creative license. Raffaele and Amanda have had two basic stories, what they said on 5-6 November, and what they said both before and after.

  14. RoseMontague Says:

    Chris,
    It seems to me to be another case where the events of 31 October get mixed up with those of 1 November. Seems to happen quite often.

  15. Amber Says:

    Rose
    It seems more to me that anyone who doesn’t show Amanda and Raffaele in the best light is either
    A. Misinformed
    B. Lying
    C. Exaggerating
    D. Confused
    E. Doesn’t know facts as well as you do
    And Chris the Washington mistake is an easy mistake to make and everything else you say about her article is pure speculation.

  16. Chris_Halkides Says:

    Amber,

    You claimed that Raffaele was exaggerating; that is speculation. In the book, “The Fatal Gift of Beauty” Nina Burleigh wrote, “A British reporter for the Sunday Mirror, Kate Mansey, found him in a bar near Piazza Grimani a day before his arrest, and she reported that he said he and Amanda had been “at a party with a friend” on the night of the murder. He never told that story to police, though, and he later denied it in letters to me.” On 14 February 2011 Draca at the JREF forum took Mansey’s article to task for multiple errors: http://forums.randi.org/showpost.php?p=6874058&postcount=3936 These errors include Ms. Knox’s age, something that should not have been that difficult to obtain.

    Here is a second article by Mansey: http://www.mirror.co.uk/sunday-mirror/2007/11/11/day-i-met-meredith-suspect-raffaele-98487-20092572/ What do you think of it?

  17. Chris_Halkides Says:

    Amber,

    Besides her hometown Ms. Mansey gave Ms. Knox’s age incorrectly, among other things. And she quotes a student as saying, “I know a lot of people who were at the party that night and it seemed they all had a good time.” This sounds like someone who is confusing 31 October with 1 November. Given Ms. Mansey’s multiple misunderstandings, it is more parsimonious to assume that she wrote a composite interview than that Raffaele lied.

  18. Another Bill Williams Says:

    “As for the police station, Amanda spent 53 of 89 hours with the police between the discovery of the murder and her effective arrest at 5:45 AM after the signing of the second statement. More than 40 of those hours in about three days she spent at the Questura, voluntarily to help police as much as she could. Those girls left the country and made catty comments to the papers after her arrest.”

    This is what I believe – if Knox had similarly immediately left the country, she would never have even been suspected, as there was no physical evidence tying her to the crime.

    Think about it. No text from Lumumba for the police to find, which I believe was the unfortunate trigger to suspecting Knox, and then Sollecito, in the first place. They still may have found a bit of Sollecito’s DNA on the bra-clasp, as that would not have changed the 46-day delay and the mishandling of that piece of evidence, and the police would, in my mind at least, not have taken one knife from Sollecito’s place which had Knox’s DNA and a bit of rye-grain…..

    What if it had been another of the flat mates? Who else was in town on the night of the 1st? Were any out of town without a real alibi? Note, one way to destroy an alibi is to also accuse the person supplying the alibi! Could we have had Romanelli, for instance, being accused if she’s had a text on her phone misinterpreted by police?

    With 20-20 hindsight, we could be typing about another flatmate right now….. and Vittoria could be interviewed as to her reaction to living with one of them.

  19. Amber Says:

    Actually bill what got her suspected was while she accompanied Raffaele to his questioning as hecwaitedvin the waiting room he said
    “”In my previous statement I told a load of rubbish because Amanda had convinced me of her version of the facts and I didn’t think about the inconsistencies.””

  20. Amber Says:

    As she waited in* sorry my iPad messed that up

  21. Chris_Halkides Says:

    Amber,

    Your comment about what got Ms. Knox suspected is not supported by the events of the previous days. The police were already bugging Ms. Knox and Mr. Sollecito’s conversations previous to 5 November. Dr. Giobbi indicated that he wanted both of them brought in that night. Judge Matteini noted that Amanda’s arrest was effected prior to her mother’s arrival in Perugia to prevent Amanda’s leaving. In at least one interview prior to 5 November the police were yelling at Ms. Knox and treating her like a criminal according to a conversation that she had with Laura. It would be nice to know what brought Raffaele to say what he did. Maybe you buy into the police’s various tales of why their interviews were not recorded, but they just amount to, “The dog ate my homework,” to me.

  22. Chris_Halkides Says:

    Amber,

    Suppose that one were to agree with you that what got Ms. Knox suspected was Raffaele’s statement. Then why was she not supplied with a lawyer at that point, according to Italian law?

  23. Clive Wismayer Says:

    Actually, I think it was their strange behaviour which brought them under suspicion, coupled with their presence and behaviour on the morning of 02/11/07 (taking a shower in a bloodbath) and the first impression that the burglary was staged.

    I think Raffaele may be the sort of person whose first reaction to an uncomfortable fact is to lie (not an uncommon type and the fact he did not give evidence at his trial suggests, to me anyway, that his lawyers shared my view) and that Amanda might well make a strange impression on some, especially those who perhaps don’t know her well or don’t share her cultural background.

    Doesn’t make them guilty of murder though and, on a close and careful consideration of the facts, they clearly aren’t. The case gets added to the very large pile of similar miscarriages attributable to unrefined prejudgement.

    I hope Sharon gets to interview more of the characters in this drama, peripheral or central, because there is something of value to be learned from all of them.

  24. Another Bill Williams Says:

    Actually bill what got her suspected was while she accompanied Raffaele to his questioning as hecwaitedvin the waiting room he said
    “”In my previous statement I told a load of rubbish because Amanda had convinced me of her version of the facts and I didn’t think about the inconsistencies.””

    ********************

    Sorry, Amber, that does not cut it. First of all, how do you know this? Is there a recording? Second as pointed out above, the police would never have “interviewed” Amanda, they would have right from the start “interrogated” her, complete with recording and lawyer, as per law.

    And further, they NEVER would have had to suspect Lumumba! They would have thought they already had two suspects, all the suspects they needed: namely Knox and Sollecito.

    Why even drag Lumumba into this, other than the fishing trip of the text-message, and misunderstanding what an American means by “See you later”?

    Please, you cannot just make things up. That’s what got Massei in trouble!

  25. Michael Wallace Says:

    Hey man I only wanted to take a moment to say i love reading your blog.

  26. The Riviera Times Says:

    The Riviera Times…

    […]Vittoria speaks again tonight in Perugia | Sharon Feinstein[…]…